Health workers, professionals receive training to implement CVD Program in Davao Region

A CVD Program staff member demonstrates the Foot Risk Assessment using the monofilament test. Photo: Mae Hazel Calimbas / Handicap International

A CVD Program staff member demonstrates the Foot Risk Assessment using the monofilament test. Photo: Jandell Geral / Handicap International

Conducted by the seven new implementers of the Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) Program, separate trainings on CVD recently convened a total of 727 community health workers and professionals from the Davao Region, southern Philippines.

The sessions were held in the implementers’ respective areas: Monkayo, Compostela Valley (with 86 attendees); Nabunturan, Compostela Valley (94); Malita, Davao Occidental (100); Mati City (144); Digos City (91); Tagum City (91); and the Island Garden City of Samal (121).

CVD Project Manager Richard Erick Caballero gives the opening remarks in the rollout training in the Island Garden City of Samal. Photo: Mae Hazel Calimbas / Handicap International

CVD Project Manager Richard Erick Caballero gives the opening remarks in the rollout training in the Island Garden City of Samal. Photo: Jandell Geral / Handicap International

The trainings focused on integrated CVD risk factor management, which includes basic foot and wound care.

According to CVD Project Manager Richard Erick Caballero, the trainees would be the ones directly dealing with the CVD Program’s new beneficiaries, who are estimated to reach 20,000.

The CVD Program was developed by Handicap International’s CVD Project, which aims to increase access to multidisciplinary diabetes care in the Davao Region. It is a collaborative public health endeavor by Handicap International, select local government units, public hospitals, and the Department of Health.

The recent trainings re-echoed the “training of trainers” held last May and June. Handicap International staff — as well as members of the Davao City Health Office, which first implemented the CVD Program — also attended the sessions to provide technical and logistical support.

A co-winner of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, Handicap International has recognized that diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are among the main causes of disability in the Philippines. For example, lack of proper foot care among people with diabetes has led to foot amputations. The Davao City-based CVD Project is part of Handicap International’s response to this public health problem.

The CVD Project is funded by the World Diabetes Foundation. Visit the CVD Project webpage for more information »