Davao City approves partnership with Handicap International

(From left) Handicap International Training Officer Mae Hazel Calimbas, Davao City Councilor for Health Mary Joselle Villafuerte, and Davao City Program Coordinator Chona Dazon witness the passing of the ordinance renewing the CVD Program in the city. Photo: Jandell Gerall / Handicap International

(From left) Handicap International Training Officer Mae Hazel Calimbas, Davao City Councilor for Health Mary Joselle Villafuerte, and Davao City Program Coordinator Chona Dazon witness the passing of the ordinance approving the renewal of the CVD Program in Davao City. Photo: Jandell Gerall / Handicap International

The City Council of Davao has approved the implementation of the Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) Program for two more years in the city. An ordinance on renewing the city’s memorandum of understanding with the CVD Program’s partners was approved on second reading on August 26.

The CVD Program is a joint endeavor of Handicap International’s CVD Project, Southern Philippines Medical Center, and Department of Health Region XII Office. It aims to improve multidisciplinary diabetes care and prevent foot complications in Davao City.

Funded by the World Diabetes Foundation, the CVD Program is now replicated in seven other areas in the Davao Region – Island Garden City of Samal, Tagum City, Digos City, Mati City, Monkayo (Compostela Valley), Nabunturan (Compostela Valley), and Malita (Davao Occidental).

The accomplishments of the CVD Program in Davao City was presented at the World Diabetes Congress in Melbourne, Australia last year. The publication, How to Support Local Government to Integrate CVD and Diabetes Prevention and Management into Existing Health Systems – the Davao City Experience, Philippines, describes the program’s experience from its inception as the Diabetes Project in 2008 to late last year.

A co-winner of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, Handicap International recognizes that diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are among the main causes of disability in the Philippines. For instance, lack of proper foot care among people with diabetes has led to foot amputations. The CVD Project is part of Handicap International’s response to this public health problem.

The CVD Project is implemented with financial support from

WDF